Inflation by any other name…

Most articles about U.S. inflation don’t mention U.S. inflation. That’s because they focus on price changes not the amount of Federal Reserve “dollars” in existence. The powers-that-be wanted to hide their devaluation of the money by simply changing the definition of the word most used to complain about the devaluation of the money. That word is “inflation.”

There may be articles about increases in the quantity of dollars, which is the real inflation, but most of the articles won’t use the word inflation. The authors might just be noting the change, without stating how an increase will harm anyone holding dollars. That is that an increase in dollars steals value from anyone holding dollars.

Take for example this Bloomberg article with the headline “Where’s the inflation?” The article states,

The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that overall consumer prices were down 0.2 percent in July from a year earlier, driven largely by a sharp decline in oil prices. Even after stripping out food and energy, prices were up 1.8 percent — or 1.2 percent, according to the Fed’s preferred measure, produced by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. That’s well below the central bank’s longer-term target of 2 percent.

The article is supposed to be about inflation, yet it focuses on prices changes. It also mentions the two percent inflation target of Federal Reserve, which is really a price change target.

They have done a good job of distracting attention away from the issuing of new dollars. And they need to do this because inflation was 14 percent in 2012 and is now about 7 percent in 2015. (See charts). Inflation is so bad that in just seven years, the banks (working with borrowers) doubled the number of dollars in existence. This means that the value of the dollar will soon be half of what it would have been if those new dollars had not been issued. That’s why a lunch sandwich costs about $10 when it used to cost five dollars about seven years ago, wouldn’t you say?

If you want to reach about inflation, visit this site, not Bloomberg or most of the corporate media. You should note that many media companies are owned by companies that want low interest rates on loans. Interest rates can be low if the banks are simply creating the money. If the banks actually had to borrow the money from someone else, than interest rates would rise and loans would cost more.

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